Biker’s ‘90-minute’ wait for ambulance

Toby Higgins being looked after by police following motorbike accident. An ambulance took 90 minutes to arrive.

Toby Higgins being looked after by police following motorbike accident. An ambulance took 90 minutes to arrive.

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A motorcyclist who was injured in a collision with a car spent over an hour in the road screaming in pain while waiting for an ambulance.

Toby Higgins, 18, of Bradville, was riding at 45mph on Dansteed Way near Daytona Motorsport, on June 3, at 11.10pm when his motorbike and the car collided, throwing him over his handlebars and into the road.

Although Thames Valley Police and South Central Ambulance were called straight away, it took over an hour for the ambulance to arrive from Banbury.

Toby’s mum, Sally Norman, who was called to the scene after the crash, claimed it took 90 minutes for the ambulance to arrive and said he spent the whole time sat in the road back to back with a police officer who provided support.

Mrs Norman said Toby had a broken collar bone and a gash on his head.

“I think the amount of time it took for the ambulance to arrive is diabolical,” she said. “One of the officers on the scene said he’d never known anything like it.”

But Mrs Norman added she couldn’t fault the care the ambulance gave him.

She said: “It is a long time at that time of night to listen to your child scream in pain.

“Had his injuries been life-threatening, I could have been planning his funeral and not his recovery.”

A spokesman from South Central Ambulance Service said: “The call was categorised as one requiring a 30-minute response. It is regrettable we did not arrive on scene until 12.21am. We apologise on this occasion the service we aim to achieve was not of the standard we set ourselves and strive to deliver for every patient.

“We are currently reviewing the call so that we can address any learning or feedback points. We are therefore unable to comment further at this time.

“SCAS continues to see a high demand on services. This has ultimately put significant pressure on our ability to respond to patients as quickly as we would like and we are continuing to work extremely hard to get to all of our patients as quickly as we can.”