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TRIBUTES from friends devastated by victoria’s tragic death crossing grid road

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Tributes have been paid to a “wonderful” young woman killed crossing a dual carriageway – prompting calls for a new campaign to slash the 70mph speed limit on city grid roads.

Victoria Rhodes, who celebrated her 21st birthday two weeks ago, had a learning disability and mild autism.

She was struck by a car on Monday morning after attempting to cross the V11 near Broughton fire station to reach a bus stop.

Two friends from her supported living scheme were walking with her – but both opted to use the footbridge a short distance away.

Victoria attended Walnut Tree-based MK Snap, where she was filmed acting and dancing in a special production just three days before her death.

Snap chief executive Maureen McColl told the Citizen: “All the learners and staff here are devastated by the tragic death of a much-loved and highly thought of young lady. Victoria was a very popular member of Snap.

“She was on the brink of so many opportunities and she had so much to live for.”

She said Victoria studied money management, media studies and performing arts. Pasionate about singing and performing, she had been given one of the leading roles in the summer production The S Factor.

“She had a beautiful larger than life personality and we will miss her very much,” said Maureen.

Experts believe Victoria’s autism was the reason she made the fatal decision to take the most direct but dangerous route that led to her death.

“People with autism see everything extremely logically. They would not take an unconventional route out of rebellion – they would do it because it is the most logical and quickest way,” said one.

“If there are no warning signs, they would take the most direct route, They cannot help thinking like that,” he added.

The tragedy has now revived a long-standing debate about whether grid road speed limits should be cut to 50mph – and already there are mixed opinions.

 

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