Three more jailed thanks to Operation Rouse

Gavin Walker (left) and Charles Stephen (right)

Gavin Walker (left) and Charles Stephen (right)

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Three men from Milton Keynes have been sent to prison for a total of six years for drug offences in connection with Operation Rouse.

The on-going investigation looks into the supply of class A drugs in the city and its impact on related crimes, such as burglary and theft.

A further two men received community orders.

Gavin Walker (pictured top left), 24, of Newell Road, Henley Green, Coventry, admitted one count of possession with intent to supply class A drugs, namely heroin, and was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment.

And Charles Stephen (pictured top right), 35, admitted three counts of being concerned in the supply of a class A drugs – cocaine and heroin – and was sentenced to two 18-month sentences for being concerned in the supply of a class A drugs, to run concurrently. He was also sentenced to eight months imprisonment for the theft of a motor vehicle and criminal damage, to run consecutively and eight months disqualification from driving.

Spencer Layne, 25, of The Gables, Wolverton, admitted being concerned in the supply of class A drugs, namely heroin, and was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

Levi Way, 28, of Chervil, Beanhill, admitted one count of being concerned in the supply of class A drugs, namely heroin, and was sentenced to a 12 month community order and a 12 month Drug Rehabilitation Requirement.

And Robert Hill, 29, of North Seventh Street, admitted one count of being concerned in the supply of class A drugs – heroin – and one count of possessing class B drugs – cannabis – and was sentenced to 12 month community order and a 12 month Drug Rehabilitation Requirement.

Following the sentencing, Area Commander Superintendent Barry Halliday, said: “I hope today’s court proceedings demonstrate our ongoing commitment to targeting people involved in the supply of class A drugs in Milton Keynes and bringing them to justice.

“This operation, which involved a great deal of investigative work and planning, has been a great success and five people have now been convicted as a result of it.

“We remain resolute in our priority to disrupt the supply of class A drugs to our communities. Those who continue to be involved in the supply of class A drugs should not feel complacent and can also expect an early-morning wake-up call to face the consequences of their actions.

“Drug-dealing and drug use has serious consequences for communities, as users have to find ways to fund their habit, often resorting to committing crimes such as burglaries, robberies and thefts.

“I continue to urge the public to continue helping us in the fight against drugs and report any suspicious activity to police through the 24-hour Police Enquiry Centre on 101.”