Medal of honour for brave soldier Curtis

Soldiers from 207 Signal Squadron, part of 7th Armoured Brigade (The Desert Rats) receive their Op Herrick tour medals from Colonel Paul Eaton whilst on parade in front of their families and friends  in Bergen-Hohne after finishing their operational tour of Afghanistan (Operation Herrick 14).
Soldiers from 207 Signal Squadron, part of 7th Armoured Brigade (The Desert Rats) receive their Op Herrick tour medals from Colonel Paul Eaton whilst on parade in front of their families and friends in Bergen-Hohne after finishing their operational tour of Afghanistan (Operation Herrick 14).

A SOLDIER from Milton Keynes has been presented with his campaign medal after a demanding six month tour in Afghanistan.

Signaller Curtis Tompkins, 19, was deployed with 207 Signals Squadron which provided communications support across Helmand Province between March and October.

Soldiers from 207 Signal Squadron, part of 7th Armoured Brigade (The Desert Rats) receive their Op Herrick tour medals from Colonel Paul Eaton whilst on parade in front of their families and friends  in Bergen-Hohne after finishing their operational tour of Afghanistan (Operation Herrick 14).

Soldiers from 207 Signal Squadron, part of 7th Armoured Brigade (The Desert Rats) receive their Op Herrick tour medals from Colonel Paul Eaton whilst on parade in front of their families and friends in Bergen-Hohne after finishing their operational tour of Afghanistan (Operation Herrick 14).

Personnel were primarily involved in bolstering the Communications squadron of 3 Commando Brigade and managing communications at Forward Operating Bases (FOBs) and check points, working with the Afghan Army and also taking on an infantry role going on patrols and manning sangers (guard watch towers).

The former Leon School student joined the Army in 2008 as a Communications Systems Operator and received his medal at a special ceremony at his barracks in Bergen Hohne in Northern Germany.

He said: “I went out as a rear link detachment attached to 42 Commando maintaining the Operations room. I also manned the sanger watch towers in the camp, looking out for any suspicious activity or sign of the enemy.

“It was a bit nerve-racking at first as I didn’t really know what to expect, but it was alright in the end and there weren’t any major incidents. The main problem was the heat which would sometimes reach the mid 50s.

“I also listened out on radios for different call signs on the ground from patrols, and when they needed support I would contact Task Force Helmand who would provide it.”

MK Dons fan Curtis, whose parents Gary and Steph still live in Milton Keynes, was one of 39 members of the squadron to deploy to Afghanistan.

He added: “It was a busy tour but I enjoyed it. It was a really great experience and I would like to go back sometime.

“I am pleased to get my medal, especially at such a young age. I am very proud to have done my first tour so early and will be taking my medal back home to show my family in Milton Keynes.”