Personal data breached by Milton Keynes Council

Milton Keynes Council
Milton Keynes Council
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Personal data was breached twice in three years by Milton Keynes Council, according to research by a civil liberties group.

Between April 2011 and April 2014, Big Brother Watch found that “confidential records” were accessed, which resulted in a member of staff being sacked.

Highest number of data breaches: This table shows the local authorities that have reported the largest number of data breaches between April 1, 2011 and April 1, 2014.

Highest number of data breaches: This table shows the local authorities that have reported the largest number of data breaches between April 1, 2011 and April 1, 2014.

The report reveals that during the same period there were 4,236 data breaches by local authorities across the UK - a 300 per cent increase in four years.

In the second case of data being breached at MK Council, an employee attempted to access records that they were “not assigned to manage”.

The offender was given a written warning. Neither person involved in data breaching at MK Council was convicted.

But the council ensures it takes the protection of its citizens data “extremely seriously” and has a number of systems and processes in place to ensure that it is “protected appropriately”.

Breakdown of physical losses and thefts

Breakdown of physical losses and thefts

Across the country, just 2.1 per cent of the data breaches resulted in resignation or dismissal where action was taken.

68 per cent of cases involved no disciplinary action.

Brighton and Hove council ranked first for the highest number of data breaches with 190 offences during the three year period - in comparison to just two in Milton Keynes.

But across the UK, there were 4,236 breaches in local authorities, including 401 instances of data loss or theft and 658 children’s personal data was involved in a data breach.

A Milton Keynes Council spokesman said: “Should we discover a breach immediate action is taken to rectify the situation and minimise the effects caused by such a breach.

“If staff fail to properly manage data they are responsible for, then this is viewed seriously by the council and can (and has) resulted in disciplinary action being taken against the individual, including dismissal.

“As a council we are constantly working to improve the management and security of our information and staff are fully trained and regularly reminded of the importance of data protection and how best they can help in protecting it.”

You can access the full report here.