Youth fight for jobs is on as thousands join march

Youth Fight For Jobs protest march along route of Yarrow Marchers
Youth Fight For Jobs protest march along route of Yarrow Marchers

DOZENS of young people from across the city have joined a national campaign to protest about the lack of job opportunities for work people.

The campaigners started their march in Jarrow, a town in Tyne and Wear, attracting the support of trade unionists, students and unemployed activists as it made its way through Milton Keynes en route to London.

Youth Fight For Jobs protest march along route of Yarrow Marchers

Youth Fight For Jobs protest march along route of Yarrow Marchers

On Sunday, the Youth March for Jobs reached the city at about 4.30pm where they attended a special meeting at the MADCAP Performing Arts Centre.

University graduate, Anisha Pandya, 22, said: “I was born and raised in Milton Keynes in a working class family in Springfield. I was led to believe that if I worked hard at school to get to university then I would be able to get a job at the end of it.

“Since graduating this year the only work that I have been able to get is agency temping work. Why should young people like myself be expected to suffer for the economic mess caused by the politicians and bankers?”

Protesters are demanding a Government scheme to create jobs which are socially useful and apprenticeships that offer guaranteed jobs. They are also looking for the immediate reinstatement of Education Maintenance Allowance payments, re-opening of all youth services that have been closed and the scrapping of ‘workfare schemes.

The march has received backing from a number of groups including Unite, the Communication Workers Union, and Milton Keynes Trades Council (MKTC).

Peter Knight, vice chairman of MKTC, said: “We need to get the message across that nothing has changed in the last 28 years. There are people like Anisha who have done everything right, worked hard at school, got a degree but they are lucky to even get jobs with temping agencies.

“We want to get it out in the general public that there is some resistance.”

> The first Jarrow March was held in October 1936 to protest against unemployment and extreme poverty suffered in North East England.