Larry finds fame in The Lost Christmas

LarryMills'Young actor Larry Mills, of Stewkley, who is starring in a BBC film this Christmas''MPLO  WK16  M11
LarryMills'Young actor Larry Mills, of Stewkley, who is starring in a BBC film this Christmas''MPLO WK16 M11

A STEWKLEY schoolboy is set to have his Christmas dreams come true when he stars on screen in his début movie alongside acting heroes comedian Eddie Izzard and action man Jason Flemyng.

Larry Mills, 11, had only had small parts in productions at his former village school before being plucked from obscurity to play a major role in the BBC’s big family film this December, The Lost Christmas.

He gets second billing playing a character called Goose behind BAFTA, Olivier and two-time Emmy award-winner Izzard who appears as Anthony, a mysterious man who appears on Manchester’s snowy streets at Christmas Eve with a remarkable gift. It’s a modern-day urban fairy-tale and it is expected to be a big ratings winner this Yuletide.

Larry, who lives with his family in High Street South, Stewkley, first got interested in drama watching his late mother, Laura, run stagecraft classes. The whole family have an interest in performing. Father Chris studied drama at university and wanted to follow in Laurence Olivier’s footsteps (with Larry being named after his father’s thespian hero) while older sister Claudia has been singing professionally since she was seven.

The youngster first tried out in an audition for a film version of Horrid Henry last year after his former school, St Michael’s, were contacted by casting agents. Though unsuccessful he later received a call asking him to attend a further audition for a new family film being made for the BBC. After seeing thousands of young hopefuls Larry heard just before last Christmas that he had landed a part – and not just any part – but the lead.

He gets his first chance to see his finished performance when producers run a special screening of The Lost Christmas on December 11 at the British Film Institute in London ahead of its television and cinema première. The rest of the public can see the film on TV this Yuletide.

Read Tuesday’s LBO for the full feature.